oklahoma

Wanette man jailed in shooting incident

A Wanette man was jailed Monday on a shooting with intent to kill complaint after his friend suffered a gunshot wound to the head during an alleged argument.

Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Capt. Travis Palmer said deputies responded about 1:30 p.m. to a home on Trousdale Road, about one mile west of SH 102 in the Wanette area.

The shooting victim, Randall Roberson, 53, had called 911 for help, Palmer said, and told dispatchers the suspect, Jerry Miller, 62, was still inside the home.

After calling to report his injury, Roberson flagged down a propane truck driven by the Wanette firefighter, who drove him to the end of the road to await an ambulance, Palmer said.

Deputies responded to the scene. Roberson, who suffered an injury along the top of his head, Palmer said, was taken by REACT EMS to Unity Health Center for treatment. Medi Flight was originally called, but wasn’t needed, Palmer said.

Roberson told deputies he was at Miller’s home when the two of them, who are friends, got into an argument. Roberson told authorities he was watching TV when Miller left the room and returned. He allegedly “pointed a gun and pulled the trigger,” Palmer said.

Roberson told deputies Miller was still inside the home with weapons. Deputies, along with the District Attorney’s Drug and Violent Crime Task Force and tribal officers, set up a perimeter around the home and tried to negotiate with Miller, Palmer said, but Miller wouldn’t answer the phone or bullhorn calls from outside.

After about 30 minutes, Palmer said law enforcement officers breached a door to make entry, where Miller, who was reportedly asleep, raised up from the sofa and complied with commands. Palmer said Miller told deputies he didn’t know about anyone getting shot.

Deputies said they found a .22 caliber rille inside the home and arrested Miller on a complaint of shooting with intent to kill. He was booked into he Pottawatomie County Public Safety Center. Formal charges have not been filed.

While the incident remains under investigation, Palmer said it appears both men were drinking alcohol at the time of the incident.

Deputies: ‘Don’t be suckered’ by lottery check scam

Once again, fake lottery letters with cashier’s checks have arrived in Shawnee mailboxes, prompting law enforcement officers to issue warnings to area residents. The most recent mailing comes from an address in London, England, with a claim that the person is the winner of the Australia Sweepstakes lottery. The Shawnee resident who received this mailing, along with what appears to be a real cashier’s check, became suspicious and turned over the items to the Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff Mike Booth said the letter and $4,995 check, are a scam and residents need to be aware of such cons to avoid becoming victims.
“If it looks too good to be true, it is,” Booth said. It’s a scam, no matter how good it looks.” The letterhead shows Featureview Trust Inc., and includes the Shawnee man’s name and his address where it was mailed, and claims to be from the International Claims Department in London, England. The letter claims the resident has won $250,000 through a random computer ballot system drawn from shopper names.
The letter shows the check for $4,995 is to help pay government taxes and insurance on the winnings and claims to be a payment from a claims agent.

It asks the winner not to use the check until they call a 15-digit phone number, where police said those answering work to get personal information from the caller. The fake check, with the somewhat blurry logo of well-known U.S. bank, claims to be drafted from an account in Phoenix, Ariz. “No matter how real it looks, it’s not going to get you anything,” Booth said about that check, advising residents not to cash it or give any personal information to anyone. “From that point on, you have everything to lose,” the sheriff added. Booth said residents should be suspicious if they get anything by mail such as this, especially if they have no direct knowledge of it. “Anyone with questions can bring it to their local law enforcement office,” Booth said, adding, “Don’t be suckered.”

Shawnee police issued a similar warning back in December for mailings that included similar letters for a shoppers lottery scam.
“Don’t cash the check … do not call and give them any information,” Shawnee Police Chief Russell Frantz said. Frantz said the scam works to get someone’s bank account number, either by phone or when cashing the fake check. That enables the suspects to clean out someone’s bank account before they realize the check to pay the “fees” is a fake and has bounced. “Citizens beware,” Frantz said.

Wanted: Corey Jarvis Felony Warrant $50,000 Bond

Corey Jarvis currently has felony warrant(s) for his arrest for larceny of copper. He is also wanted for questioning in another case the Sheriff’s Office is investigating concerning recent 4-wheel theft. Description: White Male, Height 510, Weight 187, Eyes Blue, Birth Date 08/15/1976, DOC#234663 and has numerous tattoos. Warrant# CF-2010-0605 Bond: $50,000. If you know where he can be located please call Captain Travis Palmer at (405) 273-1727 or (405) 481-9005. You may also send us a confidential message by email to: warrants@pottcoso.com Download Wanted Poster (Click Here)

Suspect still sought following police pursuit

Law enforcement officers in both Lincoln and Pottawatomie counties are still on the lookout for a person wanted for questioning in connection with two pursuits relating to stolen vehicles and trailers Monday night. Lincoln County Sheriff Charlie Dougherty reported the pursuit began in Pottawatomie County as deputies tried to stop a pickup towing a stolen box trailer. Dougherty has identified the driver they are still looking for as David Carter of Meeker. A passenger in the vehicle, identified by deputies at Eric L. Grimm, 24, stayed inside the vehicle and was taken into custody by Pottawatomie County deputies, Dougherty said. He said the stolen vehicle was recovered, while a manhunt commenced for Carter.
The pursuit entered Lincoln County on 3440 Road and continued north, he said. About one mile south of SH 62, officers set up road blocks, but the vehicle continued. A bit farther north, Dougherty said Meeker Police Officer Matt Willis was okay after the pickup clipped that officer’s leg while he attempted to deploy more stop sticks. Before that, the driver allegedly swerved his vehicle toward a Pottawatomie County sheriff’s unit occupied by a deputy. The pursuit came to an end more than a mile later where the roadway ends, with Carter reportedly fleeing the vehicle on foot, Dougherty said. Formal charges have not been filed against either. Grimm is now jailed on a complaint of knowingly concealing stolen property. Two tracking dogs were used to search for Carter at the end of pursuit before Midnight. About 2:45 a.m. Tuesday, a Ford pickup with attached flat-bed trailer was reported stolen in the general area, Dougherty said. Pottawatomie County deputies located it and began a pursuit of that stolen vehicle within 15 minutes of the report, but lost sighting, Dougherty said. That stolen vehicle was recovered in the Earlsboro area Tuesday, with case reports pointing to Carter also being connected to that vehicle as well, Dougherty said. Anyone with information about Carter should contact authorities.

‘Most wanted’ fugitive nabbed in Shawnee

Through cooperative efforts of law enforcement agencies, one of the state’s most wanted fugitives sought by the U.S. Marshal’s Metro Fugitive Squad was apprehended at a Shawnee home Sunday evening.

Floyd Grass, 34, was arrested about 6 p.m. at 1832 W. Wiley, said Chad Pope, who serves as a special deputy with the U.S. Marshals’ Metro Fugitive Squad. Pope, who also is a Pottawatomie County sheriff’s deputy, said a tip led authorities to that home. Pope said the arrest was made “with a lot of cooperation” between agencies, who began working together in the days beforehand in attempts to locate Grass. Grass, who was sought on a federal warrant for a probation violation, also had state warrants from Pottawatomie County for two felony cases — aggravated assault and battery and placing bodily fluid on a government employee, Pope said.

The search for Grass had been ongoing in the area several days, he said. That search involved U.S. marshals being in town to follow leads, with assistance by the district attorney’s task force. Pope said they had looked for Grass at several locations, but he wasn’t there. From cooperative work and interviews in the days leading up to the arrest, the tip on Sunday led authorities to his location. Pope said the entire Pottawatomie County sheriff’s office warrant team along with several Shawnee police officers assisted in the arrest. Prior to going to that home, Pope said authorities received word that Grass had a police scanner and was armed. When police surrounded the home and made the arrest, they found a police scanner, but no firearm, Pope said. Two others at that home were arrested on unrelated city of Shawnee municipal warrants. Grass is jailed at the Pottawatomie County Public Safety Center.

According to jail rosters, Grass has a $50,000 bond for each of the two state counts. Those two counts are for separate Pottawatomie County cases in which Grass had warrants issued in 2007 after failing to appear in court, records show. Grass also is being held without a bond on the federal charge, which involves possession of a weapon, jail records show. He’s also being held on a complaint of unlawful use of a police radio.

Weather Conditions Still Treacherous

All Pottawatomie County roads remained slick and hazardous and many were littered with stalled vehicles Wednesday, so officials are still urging people to stay home.

Don Lynch, Shawnee/Pottawatomie County emergency management director, said the stalled cars are making it difficult for crews to clear roadways, and continuing northerly winds Wednesday were expected to lead to further drifting. Several road closures remained mid-day Wednesday, including the southbound on-ramp to U.S. 177 from Kickapoo Spur and the northbound U.S. 177 off-ramp to Farrall Street, both because of abandoned vehicles, Lynch said.

Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Capt. Travis Palmer said he still was discouraging travel Wednesday as deputies, with four-wheel drive units, were having difficulty maneuvering roadways. “The highways are snow-packed and the east and west roads are full of snow drifts,” Palmer said, after making his way up U.S. 177 from Asher. “And the wind child out here is brutal.” And while the sun was shining Wednesday, Palmer said people shouldn’t get a false sense of security because nothing was melting. “Unless it’s an extreme emergency, don’t get out,” Palmer said, adding wrecker services were hours behind getting people unstuck after they chose to get out. There hadn’t been any reports of major accidents or injuries related to the storm, he said, but wanted to urge caution for those “playing” in the snow. A woman was killed in Oklahoma City Tuesday night, Palmer said, while being pulled behind a vehicle on some type of fashioned-sled. He advises against doing that, as there’s no control over that object in the snow. “It’s fun, but I don’t think people realize how dangerous that is,” Palmer said, encouraging everyone to have fun, but to do so in a safe manner.

Lynch said city of Shawnee street crews were continuing to plow major streets, adding most major streets have at least one lane open in both directions, but all secondary streets remained snow packed and treacherous. “We continue to urge people to stay off the roads unless it is an absolute emergency,” Lynch said. No major power outages were reported as of mid-Wednesday, although there were some reports of water pressure issues in the city of Tecumseh. A vehicle wreck damaged a fire hydrant on North Broadway Tuesday night, Lynch reported, resulting in a water line failure and low water pressure. The line break has been repaired but during the process an electrical problem occurred at the water treatment plant. Demand Wednesday morning created a situation of nearly no water pressure in Tecumseh. Crews reportedly got the electrical service restored and the pumps started, but as tanks are filling, water pressure is low, said Melvin Potter, Tecumseh’s emergency manager and E-911 director.

Both the E-911 center and city of Tecumseh were being flooded with calls reporting water issues. Potter said they’ve had numerous calls relating to the water issues and people asking about road conditions.  “We have had no major problems reported besides some semi-trucks tying up traffic,” Potter said.

Tecumseh Assistant Police Chief J.R. Kidney said main roads were somewhat better Wednesday, but secondary roads remained treacherous and several vehicles continued to get stuck. “It’s still 12 degrees,” Kidney said Wednesday afternoon. “Even though the sun is out, everything is still frozen and slick.”

The winter storm closed a number of businesses.

The Shawnee Fire Department responded with REACT EMS to calls and responded to one residential smoke alarm activation, with REACT responding to nine calls since midnight.

Greg Reid, director of REACT EMS, said most of the calls were for people who couldn’t drive themselves to the hospital, including a woman in labor. Two women were taken to the hospital for labor Tuesday.  Overall, Reid said mid-Wednesday things had been going fairly well, but said even the large ambulances were sometimes getting stuck on snow-packed roadways, so he still advises motorists to stay home. Luckily, paramedics hadn’t responded to any calls of hypothermia in these conditions, he said.

Lynch reports the cities of Asher and Maud had similar road issues.  The Shawnee Police Department responded since midnight to at least four non-injury accidents.

Fighting Back Against Identity Theft

What is identity theft?

Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personally identifying information, like your name, Social Security number, or credit card number, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes.

The FTC estimates that as many as 9 million Americans have their identities stolen each year. In fact, you or someone you know may have experienced some form of identity theft.
The crime takes many forms. Identity thieves may rent an apartment, obtain a credit card, or establish a telephone account in your name. You may not find out about the theft until you review your credit report or a credit card statement and notice charges you didn’t make—or until you’re contacted by a debt collector.

Identity theft is serious. While some identity theft victims can resolve their problems quickly, others spend hundreds of dollars and many days repairing damage to their good name and credit record.  Some consumers victimized by identity theft may lose out on job opportunities, or be denied loans for education, housing or cars because of negative information on their credit reports. In rare cases, they may even be arrested for crimes they did not commit.

How do thieves steal an identity?

Identity theft starts with the misuse of your personally identifying information such as your name and Social Security number, credit card numbers, or other financial account information. For identity thieves, this information is as good as gold.
Skilled identity thieves may use a variety of methods to get hold of your information, including:

  1. Dumpster Diving. They rummage through trash looking for bills or other paper with your personal information on it.
  2. Skimming. They steal credit/debit card numbers by using a special storage device when processing your card.
  3. Phishing. They pretend to be financial institutions or companies and send spam or pop-up messages to get you to reveal your personal information.
  4. Changing Your Address. They divert your billing statements to another location by completing a change of address form.
  5. Old-Fashioned Stealing. They steal wallets and purses; mail, including bank and credit card statements; pre-approved credit offers; and new checks or tax information. They steal personnel records, or bribe employees who have access.
  6. Pretexting. They use false pretenses to obtain your personal information from financial institutions, telephone companies, and other sources.  For more information about pretexting, click here.

What do thieves do with a stolen identity?

Once they have your personal information, identity thieves use it in a variety of ways.

Credit card fraud:

  • They may open new credit card accounts in your name. When they use the cards and don’t pay the bills, the delinquent accounts appear on your credit report.
  • They may change the billing address on your credit card so that you no longer receive bills, and then run up charges on your account. Because your bills are now sent to a different address, it may be some time before you realize there’s a problem.

Phone or utilities fraud:

  • They may open a new phone or wireless account in your name, or run up charges on your existing account.
  • They may use your name to get utility services like electricity, heating, or cable TV.

Bank/finance fraud:

  • They may create counterfeit checks using your name or account number.
  • They may open a bank account in your name and write bad checks.
  • They may clone your ATM or debit card and make electronic withdrawals your name, draining your accounts.
  • They may take out a loan in your name.

Government documents fraud:

  • They may get a driver’s license or official ID card issued in your name but with their picture.
  • They may use your name and Social Security number to get government benefits.
  • They may file a fraudulent tax return using your information.

Other fraud:

  • They may get a job using your Social Security number.
  • They may rent a house or get medical services using your name.
  • They may give your personal information to police during an arrest. If they don’t show up for their court date, a warrant for arrest is issued in your name.

How can you find out if your identity was stolen?

The best way to find out is to monitor your accounts and bank statements each month, and check your credit report on a regular basis. If you check your credit report regularly, you may be able to limit the damage caused by identity theft. For more information, visit the Detect Identity Theft section.

Unfortunately, many consumers learn that their identity has been stolen after some damage has been done.

  • You may find out when bill collection agencies contact you for overdue debts you never incurred.
  • You may find out when you apply for a mortgage or car loan and learn that problems with your credit history are holding up the loan.
  • You may find out when you get something in the mail about an apartment you never rented, a house you never bought, or a job you never held.

What should you do if your identity is stolen?

Filing a police report, checking your credit reports, notifying creditors, and disputing any unauthorized transactions are some of the steps you must take immediately to restore your good name. To learn more about these steps and more, visit the DEFEND:  Recover from Identity Theft section. To file a complaint, click here.

Should you file a police report if your identity is stolen?

A police report that provides specific details of the identity theft is considered an Identity Theft Report, which entitles you to certain legal rights when it is provided to the three major credit reporting agencies or to companies where the thief misused your information.  An Identity Theft Report can be used to permanently block fraudulent information that results from identity theft,such as accounts or addresses, from appearing on your credit report. It will also make sure these debts do not reappear on your credit reports. Identity Theft Reports can prevent a company from continuing to collect debts that result from identity theft, or selling them to others for collection. An Identity Theft Report is also needed to place an extended fraud alert on your credit report.

You may not need an Identity Theft Report if the thief made charges on an existing account and you have been able to work with the company to resolve the dispute.  Where an identity thief has opened new accounts in your name, or where fraudulent charges have been reported to the consumer reporting agencies, you should obtain an Identity Theft Report so that you can take advantage of the protections you are entitled to.

In order for a police report to entitle you to the legal rights mentioned above, it must contain specific details about the identity theft.  You should file an ID Theft Complaint with the FTC and bring your printed ID Theft Complaint with you to the police station when you file your police report.  The printed ID Theft Complaint can be used to support your local police report to ensure that it includes the detail required.

A police report is also needed to get copies of the thief’s application, as well as transaction information from companies that dealt with the thief.  To get this information, you must submit a request in writing, accompanied by the police report, to the address specified by the company for this purpose.  You can find more information and a model letter here.

How long can the effects of identity theft last?

It’s difficult to predict how long the effects of identity theft may linger. That’s because it depends on many factors including the type of theft, whether the thief sold or passed your information on to other thieves, whether the thief is caught, and problems related to correcting your credit report.

Victims of identity theft should monitor financial records for several months after they discover the crime. Victims should review their credit reports once every three months in the first year of the theft, and once a year thereafter. Stay alert for other signs of identity theft.

Don’t delay in correcting your records and contacting all companies that opened fraudulent accounts.  Make the initial contact by phone, even though you will normally need to follow up in writing.  The longer the inaccurate information goes uncorrected, the longer it will take to resolve the problem.

What can you do to help fight identity theft?

A great deal.

Awareness is an effective weapon against many forms identity theft. Be aware of how information is stolen and what you can do to protect yours, monitor your personal information to uncover any problems quickly, and know what to do when you suspect your identity has been stolen.

Armed with the knowledge of how to protect yourself and take action, you can make identity thieves’ jobs much more difficult. You can also help fight identity theft by educating your friends, family, and members of your community. The FTC has prepared a collection of easy-to-use materials to enable anyone regardless of existing knowledge about identity theft to inform others about this serious crime.

Please visit the sites below for more resources by clicking on the logo’s.