tecumseh

Have you seen Hank? Help bring a Tecumseh boys dog home.

Have you seen Hank?  Hank is missing from his home located in Tecumseh and his owner a Tecumseh boy misses him greatly.  Hank was last seen Monday evening 12/11/2016 near his home located close to the intersection of Sandy Rock Road and Coker Road.

If you know where he might be help us return him home.  Please call the Sheriff’s Office (405) 273-1727, email us info@pottcoso.com or send us a private message on Facebook. #hankcomehome

Update: Tecumseh Suspicious Person Sought Now In Custody

suspicious-person

Updated: 10/26/2016 at 12:30pm Robert Eugene Reed was just taken into custody for an outstanding warrant out of Pontotoc County for his arrest.

Offense or Cause

 

 

Earlier: Our office responded to a suspicious vehicle call in the area of Sharon Rd and Waco Rd near the Tecumseh Lake.  The reporting party noticed a white male approximately 5’10, 190-200 lbs wearing a black shirt and shorts walking. He appeared to have blood on his face, arms and chest covered in mud for unknown reasons.  When our office arrived on scene the male subject ran East into the wooded area from the deputy.  Currently it is unknown if any crime has been committed by this person but we would like to identify him and possibly check his welfare. Law enforcement are in the area, please report any sightings to our office (405) 273-1727 or 911.

Weather Conditions Still Treacherous

All Pottawatomie County roads remained slick and hazardous and many were littered with stalled vehicles Wednesday, so officials are still urging people to stay home.

Don Lynch, Shawnee/Pottawatomie County emergency management director, said the stalled cars are making it difficult for crews to clear roadways, and continuing northerly winds Wednesday were expected to lead to further drifting. Several road closures remained mid-day Wednesday, including the southbound on-ramp to U.S. 177 from Kickapoo Spur and the northbound U.S. 177 off-ramp to Farrall Street, both because of abandoned vehicles, Lynch said.

Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Capt. Travis Palmer said he still was discouraging travel Wednesday as deputies, with four-wheel drive units, were having difficulty maneuvering roadways. “The highways are snow-packed and the east and west roads are full of snow drifts,” Palmer said, after making his way up U.S. 177 from Asher. “And the wind child out here is brutal.” And while the sun was shining Wednesday, Palmer said people shouldn’t get a false sense of security because nothing was melting. “Unless it’s an extreme emergency, don’t get out,” Palmer said, adding wrecker services were hours behind getting people unstuck after they chose to get out. There hadn’t been any reports of major accidents or injuries related to the storm, he said, but wanted to urge caution for those “playing” in the snow. A woman was killed in Oklahoma City Tuesday night, Palmer said, while being pulled behind a vehicle on some type of fashioned-sled. He advises against doing that, as there’s no control over that object in the snow. “It’s fun, but I don’t think people realize how dangerous that is,” Palmer said, encouraging everyone to have fun, but to do so in a safe manner.

Lynch said city of Shawnee street crews were continuing to plow major streets, adding most major streets have at least one lane open in both directions, but all secondary streets remained snow packed and treacherous. “We continue to urge people to stay off the roads unless it is an absolute emergency,” Lynch said. No major power outages were reported as of mid-Wednesday, although there were some reports of water pressure issues in the city of Tecumseh. A vehicle wreck damaged a fire hydrant on North Broadway Tuesday night, Lynch reported, resulting in a water line failure and low water pressure. The line break has been repaired but during the process an electrical problem occurred at the water treatment plant. Demand Wednesday morning created a situation of nearly no water pressure in Tecumseh. Crews reportedly got the electrical service restored and the pumps started, but as tanks are filling, water pressure is low, said Melvin Potter, Tecumseh’s emergency manager and E-911 director.

Both the E-911 center and city of Tecumseh were being flooded with calls reporting water issues. Potter said they’ve had numerous calls relating to the water issues and people asking about road conditions.  “We have had no major problems reported besides some semi-trucks tying up traffic,” Potter said.

Tecumseh Assistant Police Chief J.R. Kidney said main roads were somewhat better Wednesday, but secondary roads remained treacherous and several vehicles continued to get stuck. “It’s still 12 degrees,” Kidney said Wednesday afternoon. “Even though the sun is out, everything is still frozen and slick.”

The winter storm closed a number of businesses.

The Shawnee Fire Department responded with REACT EMS to calls and responded to one residential smoke alarm activation, with REACT responding to nine calls since midnight.

Greg Reid, director of REACT EMS, said most of the calls were for people who couldn’t drive themselves to the hospital, including a woman in labor. Two women were taken to the hospital for labor Tuesday.  Overall, Reid said mid-Wednesday things had been going fairly well, but said even the large ambulances were sometimes getting stuck on snow-packed roadways, so he still advises motorists to stay home. Luckily, paramedics hadn’t responded to any calls of hypothermia in these conditions, he said.

Lynch reports the cities of Asher and Maud had similar road issues.  The Shawnee Police Department responded since midnight to at least four non-injury accidents.

Checkpoints net citations, arrests

The coalition of law enforcement officers who conducted numerous traffic safety checkpoints in Shawnee, Tecumseh and areas of McLoud Friday were pleased to find many people were buckled up, but they also discovered many driving without insurance and a few without valid driver licenses.
Shawnee Police Chief Russell Frantz said officers from many agencies worked together as part of the coalition’s efforts, and there was great cooperation and camaraderie.
One the larger checkpoints was held between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. on U.S. 177 and Benson Park Road, an intersection where officers have worked many accidents throughout the years.
Traffic was backed up for a time there as law enforcement officers checked 422 vehicles. Officers found 14 had expired tags and six drivers failed to have insurance on their vehicle, while three didn’t have their verification forms. Four people were driving without a valid driver license and one was driving with a suspended license.
Overall, Tecumseh Police Chief Gary Crosby said the checkpoints were a success because most people were buckled up. Whether the motorists were already buckled up or did so just before approaching the front of the checkpoint, he hopes motorists will continue to use seat belts for safety.
Crosby said there was a great camaraderie of all the departments working together. Most of the problems they found were those driving without insurance and driver licenses.
Despite a few motorists that didn’t like the road blocks, Crosby said he was “touched” to find that many drivers appreciated what the officers were doing to make the roadways safer for all drivers.
“So many were telling me ‘Thank you, Thank you,’” Crosby said.
The coalition also worked a checkpoint at Gordon Cooper Drive and Bob Crouch, where 215 vehicles were checked. One driver was not wearing a seat belt and six vehicles had expired tags.
Earlier in the day, the coalition worked checkpoints at Bryan and Independence, SH 3 and SH 9A, 45th and Union and Bethel and Hardesty Road.
At Bryan and Independence, police checked 184 vehicles, where they found 14 drivers had no insurance. There was only one seat belt violation there. At SH 3 and SH 9A, officers checked 336 cars, where they found 23 drivers without insurance, two who had expired tags and two arrests were made for people driving under suspension.
At 45th and Union, police found 15 without insurance, two with expired tags and one who was driving under suspension. They also made two arrests for marijuana.
McLoud Police Lt. Tim Boyd agreed the multi-agency approach went well. And while they found many who didn’t have insurance, Boyd said most drivers seemed to be cooperative with driver licenses and insurance forms in hand, ready for officers to check them.
And while the main reason officers conducted the event was for safety, police also noticed some with tag or driver license renewals coming soon, so Boyd said they issued friendly reminders.
The checkpoint on McLoud Road at Interstate 40 about 11 p.m. Friday night netted six arrests.
Of those, one was for a firearm charge, one driver had an Oklahoma County arrest warrant and three were for drug charges.
The coalition was formed in hopes of curtailing traffic crashes. Officers were hoping the high-visibility enforcement reminded drivers to slow down, buckle up and to pay attention when behind the wheel.
Frantz said the coalition hopes to conduct future efforts when possible. The Shawnee Police Department, on behalf of the coalition, also is applying for grants that would help pay officers overtime to conduct similar events.
Because Pottawatomie County had the fourth highest fatality rate during the 2009 calendar year, the local coalition of agencies wants to do everything possible to lower that number, and the checkpoints are part of that plan.
“The basis is to raise safety awareness,” Frantz said.

2009 Shop with a Cop!

It doesn’t take 9-year-old Preston Gunter long to shop. Just a few minutes after he headed into the wilds of Wal-Mart during Sunday’s Shop with a Cop, he was standing in the checkout line with Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Troy Thompson, his shopping buddy. In his cart: an Indiana Jones video game, a Bakugan game and a large bag of Butterfingers. There was one problem. He hadn’t spent enough — there was money remaining on his gift card. So, off he went again with Trooper Thompson, quickly returning with a case for the Bakugan game. “He knew what he wanted and he knew right where to go,” Thompson said. “There were only three of the games, so he was glad he got to be one of the first to go.”
For his part, Preston didn’t say much, but his frequent smiles spoke volumes. He was one of 97 children taking part in Leadership Shawnee’s Shop with a Cop. The Shawnee Chamber of Commerce annually sponsors Leadership Shawnee and requires each class to have a project. This year’s class decided to organize Shop with a Cop and raised $7,500 to buy $75 gift cards for 92 children and presents for five of their siblings who were younger than 18 months. The 92 older children were paired up with a local enforcement officer as a shopping partner. For about two hours, the area just south of Wal-Mart’s book section was packed with children, their parents, cops and Leadership Shawnee class members. Everyone involved genuinely seemed to enjoy the experience. “All the policemen are smiling and all the kids are smiling,” said Felicia Freeman, one of the Leadership Shawnee class members. “It feels good just knowing that we helped make the kids have a good Christmas.” A total of 39 officers from the Shawnee, McLoud and Tecumseh police departments, the Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Office, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and the Absentee Shawnee Nation volunteered to help the youngsters shop. Dan Shumaker of the Shawnee Police Department said he was glad he had the opportunity to participate. His first shopping partner was a girl who bought clothes. “Her father thanked me over and over and over,” Shumaker said. “With the economy being the way it is, this is perfect timing. You could see in her face that it made a difference.” Wal-Mart supplied cookies and Hawaiian Punch for the shoppers, their parents and the cops. Brenda Burkey, a department manager, came in on her day off to run a register at a line dedicated for Shop with a Cop sales only. “I’m a sucker for the kids,” she said. “You could see their eyes light up. It was just magic.”
For some shoppers, particularly the older ones, it went fast indeed. Some of the younger ones took a more leisurely pace, savoring the moment and the company of the cop. And the program had an unintended benefit for one person not involved in Shop with a Cop. A lady went to the check-in table to sternly ask how long the policemen would be tied up at the store. When told about another hour and a half, she brightened.
“That’s great — I’m going to speed on my way home.” Despite the potential for abetting in the violation of speed laws, members have discussed continuing Shop with a Cop next year and making it annual event.

Manhunt suspect charged

A Tecumseh man arrested at the end of a manhunt May 6 after allegedly surrendering to police wearing his own handcuffs now faces nine charges, seven of them felonies.
Charles Bryan Wilson, 33, is charged in Pottawatomie County District Court with burglary in the first degree, two counts of feloniously pointing a firearm, two counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, kidnapping, manufacture of controlled dangerous substance and possession of a firearm after a former conviction.
He also faces misdemeanor charges of assault and battery and unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.
Multiple law enforcement agencies worked the manhunt east of Tecumseh following a series of events involving Wilson and his reported ex-wife, authorities said.
Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Capt. Travis Palmer said it all began with word that Wilson was en route from the Pink area to Shawnee and was allegedly making threats to kill his ex-wife. That woman left her home and went to stay with friends at a residence near SH 9 and South Rock Creek Road, Palmer said.
Palmer said Wilson showed up at that home overnight with a shotgun and allegedly kicked in the front door of that home, then dragged his ex-wife out to his truck. Before they could leave, the ex-wife was able to jump out of the pickup. As law enforcement became involved in searching that area for Wilson overnight, Palmer said authorities went to his home and also found what appeared to be a methamphetamine lab there.
As everything began to unfold by 4 a.m., deputies traced a call that Wilson allegedly made after breaking into Rath’s Auto Salvage east of Tecumseh, where a massive manhunt originated about 7 a.m. A perimeter was set up as officers and deputies from multiple agencies scoured the salvage yard and nearby woods, using several police dogs.
When deputies found Wilson just before noon that day, he apparently had his own set of handcuffs with him, Palmer said, and surrendered to his knees with his wrists cuffed in front of him.
As far as the charges, Wilson is accused of kicking in the front door of the home on May 6. He’s also accused of kidnapping his ex-wife from that same home with intent to cause her to be confined against her will. For the two counts of feloniously pointing a firearm, he is accused of pointing a shotgun at a man there and at his ex-wife.
He’s also accused of manufacturing methamphetamine at his home and for being a felon is possession of a pistol.
Wilson remained jailed on $100,000 bond Wednesday night at the Pottawatomie County Public Safety Center. His next court date is set for June 4.
If convicted of the charges, punishment ranges vary from one to 20 years in prison for each of the nine counts filed, and up to a $50,000 fine for manufacturing methamphetamine.

Woman surrenders to deputies after threatening suicide, pointing weapon at them

Six Pottawatomie County sheriff’s deputies kept a level head and held their fire when a Pink woman who had been threatening suicide pointed a weapon at them earlier this week. After negotiations, the woman surrendered and dropped the weapon, which looked like a 9 mm black pistol, but was actually a BB gun. Capt. Travis Palmer said the woman, whose name is not being released, called 911 and said she was armed with a 9 mm pistol and was going to kill herself. The E-911 center in Tecumseh was able to track her call to the Pink area, Palmer said, and Deputy Johnny Austin began negotiations with her over the phone for about one hour. Palmer said deputies used the tracking system to pinpoint the general area of her location, but they weren’t sure exactly which residence she was calling from. Several deputies responded to that general area. The woman said she was going to kill herself or force deputies to kill her as Austin continued phone negotiations. About 30 minutes later, she agreed to come out of the house. Deputies Randy Willis, Jimmy Brewer, Scott Hawkins, Brian Wolfe and Palmer went to the home with Austin and REACT EMS paramedics were at the scene in a standby mode, he said. The woman, reported to be in her 40s, didn’t come out of the home they expected and exited a nearby travel trailer, Palmer said. She took a stance and pointed her weapon at all six deputies, and while they are trained to protect their lives from shooters, none of them fired their sidearms. “I was proud of them — they took cover” behind one patrol car, Palmer said, as negotiations continued. Deputies were a distance away as the woman put the gun to her head and then pointed it at the deputies again, he said, then there was more negotiations. Austin kept talking to her, Palmer said, and the woman eventually decided to throw the weapon a few feet away from her. She was taken into custody to be medically checked and undergo evaluation, Palmer said. In the end, deputies learned the black pistol, which looked just like a 9 mm handgun, was a BB gun, “but we didn’t know that at the time,” Palmer said. Any of the deputies could have shot her to protect their own lives, he said, but none did. “The officers were professional and held their fire. I don’t know why,” he said. “The guys did a tremendous job,” Palmer added, praising Austin’s negotiation efforts. Palmer also said dispatchers at the 911 center did a great job of coordinating dispatch efforts as the deputies worked the scene. Afterward, all of the deputies were debriefed about the experience. Sheriff Mike Booth said they’ve all asked why none of them shot the woman. He said something — maybe “intuition” — stopped them. And just like officers are trained and subconsciously pull their sidearms when someone threatens or points a weapon at them, Booth said sometimes deputies pull their guns and can tell something’s not quite right. Undersheriff Dave Balleweg said there was great teamwork involved at the scene. In the end, what mattered was that no one was hurt and the woman’s life, despite her desire to end it, was spared